The GSB Online Seminar Series

The GSB Online Seminars Series offers a convenient, cost-effective way to access quality educational opportunities. Please note ALL times below in CENTRAL TIMEZONE.

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Upcoming Sessions

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Presenter: David Osburn, Osburn & Associates, LLC This 90-minute program will be presented live on: August 5, 10:00 - 11:30 am Central Time Recording available through: November 5, 2020 Price: $275   This seminar will provide the banker with the basics/refresher of accounting. The seminar will demonstrate how the income statement, statement of owner’s equity, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows are developed and connect to each other.   The seminar will also cover the ten-step accounting cycle leading up to the creation of the financial statements including the rules of debits and credits, accrual versus cash basis accounting, adjusting entries, accounting for inventory and receivables, long-term liabilities and depreciation, proper analysis of the notes to the financial statements, types of financial statements, and the CPA opinion.   The seminar will include several hands-on examples to reinforce the accounting concepts.   Items covered include:   The four financial statements- income statement, statement of owner’s equity, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows The ten-step accounting cycle (business transactions to the post-closing trial balance) Rules of debits and credits Accrual versus cash basis accounting Adjusting entries Accounting for inventory and receivables Long-term liabilities and depreciation Analysis of the notes to the financial statements Types of financial statements and the CPA opinion Examples to reinforce accounting concepts   Target Audience:  Commercial lenders, credit analysts, loan documentation specialists, branch managers, private bankers, business development officers Read More

Presenter: Richard Hamm This 90-minute program will be presented live on: August 25, 10:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m. Central Time Recording available through: November 25, 2020 Price: $275   Many Bankers underwrite loans primarily from personal and business tax returns, particularly at the community bank level. What reported income is actually cash flow? How can we properly assess a large capital gain (or loss)? How can you determine of an item is recurring? Why should you exclude non-recurring items? How do loss carryforwards affect cash flow? What is the Section 179 deduction? This program provides answers and provides case examples.   Specific subjects that will be covered during the seminar: Examples of capital gains (and losses) and how to extract the cash flow involved Issues in determining if an item is recurring When to ask questions of the borrower and/or his or her tax advisor when the tax return does not appear to make sense What is a loss carryforward item and how it should be treated in an analysis Overview of Section 179 for write-off or depreciation of assets In complex situations, ideas for limiting the analysis to material or significant items, and how to determine if further and/or annually updated information should be waived Ways to move forward with analysis while waiting for additional information Why you will often need information beyond what is reported in tax returns   Target Audience: Branch managers, consumer lenders, mortgage bankers, private bankers, small business lenders, commercial lenders, credit analysts, loan review specialists, special assets officers, lending managers and credit officers Read More

Presenter: Jay Coakley, Coakley Strategic Solutions LLC This 90-minute program will be presented live on: August 12, 10:00-11:30 a.m. Central Time Recording available through: November 12, 2020 Price: $275   In this webinar we will go through the best practices in brand development and contrast how brand relates to the bottom-line profits of the bank. We will use examples from community banks and other industries to help build the case for brand development and positioning. The real message of this webinar will focus on moving a bank’s position from commodity-based pricing to premium pricing through an understanding of brand. Premium (branded banks) will have higher NIM and higher non-interest income. We will also touch on product, culture and the marketing and sales strategies to build a premium brand.   This program will address: Brand development and positioning Pricing strategies Relationship between brand and culture Sales strategies of premium brands   Target Audience: CEOs, presidents, senior managers, retail and commercial managers, product managers and marketing managers Read More

Presenter:  Richard Hamm, Advantage Consulting and Training This 90-minute program will be presented live on: July 14, 8:30-10:00 a.m. Central Time Recording available through: October 14, 2020 Price: $275 This program unlocks the key issues in analyzing business tax returns by creating a business tax return from a conventional financial statement.  This shows the major formatting differences and ways balance sheet accounts and income statement items are labeled differently in a tax return.  It also reveals the functions of the various schedules.  By using a pass-through entity, we further see how the tax return carefully segregates items that move to an owner’s personal tax return via the Schedule K-1.  A final step is creating a chart that “maps” a financial statement to both pass-through entities and a regular corporation. After this seminar, attendees will be able to: For an example business (case), construct a tax return balance sheet (Schedule L), income statement, Schedule M-1 and Schedule M-2 on the cash basis Identify key formatting differences between a conventional financial statement and a tax return Describe how pass-through entity tax returns separate various income statement items for purposes of allocating them to the owner(s) personal tax returns On the Schedule K-1, identify the pass-through items that involve cash, compared to pass-through items that do not involve cash Describe the common relationship between pass-through income and distributions to the owner(s) Create a chart to compare and align financial statement components to the appropriate tax return schedules   Target Audience:  Credit analysts, portfolio managers, assistant relationship managers, community bankers, small business lenders, commercial lenders, consumer lenders, branch managers that lend to business owners, private bankers, special assets officers, loan review specialists and others involved in business and commercial lending   Related GSB Online Programs: Business Financial Statements & Tax Returns: Financial Statement Components, Structures and Levels of Accountant Involvement Business Financial Statements & Tax Returns: Cash vs. Accrual Accounting Refresher Business Financial Statements & Tax Returns: Developing and Analyzing Key Ratios Read More

Presenter:  Richard Hamm, Advantage Consulting and Training This 90-minute program will be presented live on: July 23, 8:30-10:00 a.m. Central Time Recording available through: October 23, 2020 Price: $275 This program covers how to calculate and analyze the basic set of financial statement (or tax return) ratios for operating businesses.  Preliminary steps (covered in related programs) include understanding the types of financial statements and level of accountant involvement, distinguishing between cash and accrual accounting methods, and the unique format and features of business tax returns.  We now turn to the four primary sets of ratios: (1) liquidity, (2) leverage, (3) profitability, (4) efficiency, and (5) debt coverage.  Using a comprehensive case, calculations are demonstrated, as wells as major issues, strengths and limitations of the various ratios.  Participants will work from a ratios reference guide that is intended to be a resource for future statement spreading. Topics to be covered include: Basic guidelines for classifying and spreading the data Identify the key components of a balance sheet Calculate liquidity and leverage ratios for an example business and interpret the results Identify situations with positive or negative working capital Describe common-sizing of the balance sheet Identify the key components of an income statement Calculate profitability and traditional cash flow measures for an example business and interpret the results Calculate efficiency and debt coverage ratios for an example business and interpret the results Explain the use of industry and comparative data within financial analysis   Target Audience:  Credit analysts, portfolio managers, assistant relationship managers, community bankers, small business lenders, commercial lenders, consumer lenders, branch managers that lend to business owners, private bankers, special assets officers, loan review specialists and others involved in business and commercial lending   Related GSB Online Programs: Business Financial Statements & Tax Returns: Financial Statement Components, Structures and Levels of Accountant Involvement Business Financial Statements & Tax Returns: Cash vs. Accrual Accounting Refresher Business Financial Statements & Tax Returns: Creating a Business Tax Return and Comparing/Mapping it to a Conventional Financial Statement Read More

Presenter:  Richard Hamm, Advantage Consulting and Training This 90-minute program will be presented live on: July 23, 10:30 a.m. -12:00  p.m. Central Time Recording available through: October 23, 2020 Price: $275 It has been said that nothing exposes the intellectual abilities of a loan officer like a credit write-up, because writing is a reflection of thinking.  And not just for loan officers, but for credit analysts, portfolio managers and others that deal with business and commercial loans. Many facets of lending are difficult to explain, especially when put into writing.  This program is centered around basic writing principles, but applied to lending.  It explores the process using five Ps.  Within the thought process and planning, there are two Ps: (1) Purpose and (2) preparation.  Within “getting it done” there are three more Ps: (3) Putting it all together, (4) Polish and (5) Pizzazz: Purpose Identifying what you want the reader to do Determining your (almost always) multiple audiences Preparation Recognizing the eight qualities of effective writing Communicating efficiently using “cover pages” Determining what supporting evidence is needed in the memorandum Finding the best format Putting it all together Identifying the unique issues in communicating data and quantitative information Outlining prior to drafting Data tables are not analysis Polish Before and after example Using white space and formatting conventions Lender liability issues Pizzazz Getting the reader’s attention Making sure that the reader does not miss key points Every package tells a story   Target Audience:  Credit analysts, portfolio managers, assistant relationship managers, community bankers, small business lenders, commercial lenders, consumer lenders, branch managers that lend to business owners, private bankers, special assets officers, loan review specialists and others involved in business and commercial lending Read More

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