The GSB Online Seminar Series

The GSB Online Seminars Series offers a convenient, cost-effective way to access quality educational opportunities. Please note ALL times below in CENTRAL TIMEZONE.

Learn more »

Upcoming Sessions

See All Upcoming Sessions

Presenter: Richard Hamm, Advantage Consulting & Training This 90-minute program will be presented live on: April 5, 8:30-10:00 a.m. Central Time Recording available through: July 5, 2022 Price: $330 Many business and commercial lenders, plus credit analysts and portfolio managers, work primarily from company-prepared financial statements, along with business tax returns.  One of the key issues in analyzing these documents is identifying the method of accounting being used.  Much like two different, foreign languages can take the same text and render it into two different-looking documents, each method of accounting takes the same financial transactions and puts them together into two different-looking financial statements.  Do you know the key differences in how cash and accrual method accounting handle these financial transactions?  Kcan you “translate” between the two methods?  Do you know which method your borrower is using? This program provides a refresher for the key issues in determining which method of accounting is being used, and what it means for the analysis process.  We also cover how and why either method is appropriate for some businesses.  It’s not a matter of which one is “best,” it’s a matter of “fit.” Attendees will learn to: Compare and contrast the cash method and accrual method of accounting For an example business (case), construct the conventional balance sheet, income statement and statement of cash flows on BOTH the cash and accrual basis Identify key differences in how individual transactions are handled between cash and accrual accounting, plus the effect on the perception of performance Describe where to find key indicators of the method being used, including where they are disclosed in various business tax return format. Describe how the statement of cash flows serves as a translator between cash and accrual accounting Why other comprehensive bases of accounting (cash and income tax) are appropriate for many smaller businesses Target Audience:  Credit analysts, portfolio managers, assistant relationship managers, community bankers, small business lenders, commercial lenders, consumer lenders, branch managers that lend to business owners, private bankers, special assets officers, loan review specialists and others involved in business and commercial lending Read More

Presenter: Richard Hamm, Advantage Consulting & Training This 90-minute program will be presented live on: March 29, 8:30-10:00 a.m. Central Time Recording available through: June 29, 2022 Price: $330 Analyzing business financial statements and tax returns starts with understanding the basic components of the balance sheet and income statement, along with the reconciliation of retained earnings, plus footnotes and other disclosures.  The business tax return is nothing more than a financial statement with similar components, but with a different format and structure.  A second step is to use a diagram, with the components in rough proportion to dollar size, to see how the components “flow” together and interact to create three major financial relationships:  (1) Sales to total assets, (2) profit retention, and (3) leverage.  A third step is to identify and understand the key principles underlying the three primary methods of accounting, followed by examining an accountant cover letter, if applicable. Topics to be covered include: Identify various financial statement analysis options and tools, plus the basic structure and purposes of financial statements and tax returns Diagram the statement components and how they flow together and create three major relationships Identify various levels of accountant-prepared financial statements (compilations, reviews and audits) and related accountant cover letters Describe key issues in using internal or company-prepared statements, as well as interim statements Compare and contrast the three primary methods of accounting Key standards, limitations and alternatives within accrual accounting or generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) Target Audience:  Credit analysts, portfolio managers, assistant relationship managers, community bankers, small business lenders, commercial lenders, consumer lenders, branch managers that lend to business owners, private bankers, special assets Read More

Presenter: Richard Hamm, Advantage Consulting & Training This 90-minute program will be presented live on: May 3, 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Central Time Recording available through: August 3, 2022 Price: $330 Cash flow models are important analytical tools provided as output from business financial statement “spreading” software used for commercial and industrial (C&I) loans.  This seminar demonstrates how to compile a statement of cash flows (SCF) as developed by accountants.  Using a “hands on” case study, the participants will learn how to calculate SCF formats, plus how to use them to evaluate business cash flow in conjunction with traditional ratio analysis.  Topics to be covered: The evolution of SFAS 95 and how the SCF is compiled by accountants Compare and contrast the “direct” format from the “indirect” format (both used in SCF) How to calculate and how to use the SCF to evaluate business cash flow, with particular focus on assessing operating cash flow consistency and reliability, plus how short-term and long-term financing affect cash flow How cash flow analysis can be integrated into and validate traditional ratio analysis and other underwriting techniques Target Audience:  Commercial lenders, credit analysts, small business lenders, private bankers, loan review specialists, lending managers and credit officers Read More

Presenter: Richard Hamm, Advantage Consulting & Training This 90-minute program will be presented live on: April 19, 8:30-10:00 a.m. Central Time Recording available through: July 19, 2022 Price: $330 This program covers how to calculate and analyze the basic set of financial statement (or tax return) ratios for operating businesses.  Preliminary steps (covered in related programs) include understanding the types of financial statements and level of accountant involvement, distinguishing between cash and accrual accounting methods, and the unique format and features of business tax returns.  We now turn to the four primary sets of ratios: (1) liquidity, (2) leverage, (3) profitability, (4) efficiency, and (5) debt coverage.  Using a comprehensive case, calculations are demonstrated, as wells as major issues, strengths and limitations of the various ratios.  Participants will work from a ratios reference guide that is intended to be a resource for future statement spreading. Topics to be covered include: Basic guidelines for classifying and spreading the data Identify the key components of a balance sheet Calculate liquidity and leverage ratios for an example business and interpret the results Identify situations with positive or negative working capital Describe common-sizing of the balance sheet Identify the key components of an income statement Calculate profitability and traditional cash flow measures for an example business and interpret the results Calculate efficiency and debt coverage ratios for an example business and interpret the results Explain the use of industry and comparative data within financial analysis Target Audience:  Credit analysts, portfolio managers, assistant relationship managers, community bankers, small business lenders, commercial lenders, consumer lenders, branch managers that lend to business owners, private bankers, special assets officers, loan review specialists and others involved in business and commercial lending Read More

Presenter: Richard Hamm, Advantage Consulting & Training This 90-minute program will be presented live on: May 10, 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Central Time Recording available through: August 10, 2022 Price: $330 The Uniform Credit Analysis (UCA) cash flow model is an important analytical tool provided as output from business financial statement “spreading” software used for commercial and industrial (C&I) loans.  This seminar demonstrates how the UCA model is derived and compares it to the statement of cash flows (SCF) prepared by accountants.  From a “hands on” case study, the participants will learn how to calculate the UCA formats, plus how to use it to evaluate business cash flow in conjunction with traditional ratio analysis.  Topics to be covered: Introduction to the UCA model and how it is derived from basic financial statements or tax returns Compare and contrast the “direct” format (used in UCA) from the “indirect” format (used in SCF) How to calculate and how to use the UCA model to evaluate business cash flow, with a focus on assessing operating cash flow consistency and reliability, plus how short-term and long-term financing affect cash flow How cash flow analysis can be integrated into and validate traditional ratio analysis and other underwriting techniques Target Audience:  Commercial lenders, credit analysts, small business lenders, private bankers, loan review specialists, lending managers and credit officers Read More

Presenter: Richard Hamm, Advantage Consulting & Training This 90-minute program will be presented live on: April 12, 8:30-10:00 a.m. Central Time Recording available through: July 12, 2022 Price: $330 This program unlocks the key issues in analyzing business tax returns by creating a business tax return from a conventional financial statement.  This shows the major formatting differences and ways balance sheet accounts and income statement items are labeled differently in a tax return.  It also reveals the functions of the various schedules.  By using a pass-through entity, we further see how the tax return carefully segregates items that move to an owner’s personal tax return via the Schedule K-1.  A final step is creating a chart that “maps” a financial statement to both pass-through entities and a regular corporation. After this seminar, attendees will be able to: For an example business (case), construct a tax return balance sheet (Schedule L), income statement, Schedule M-1 and Schedule M-2 on the cash basis Identify key formatting differences between a conventional financial statement and a tax return Describe how pass-through entity tax returns separate various income statement items for purposes of allocating them to the owner(s) personal tax returns On the Schedule K-1, identify the pass-through items that involve cash, compared to pass-through items that do not involve cash Describe the common relationship between pass-through income and distributions to the owner(s) Create a chart to compare and align financial statement components to the appropriate tax return schedules Target Audience:  Credit analysts, portfolio managers, assistant relationship managers, community bankers, small business lenders, commercial lenders, consumer lenders, branch managers that lend to business owners, private bankers, special assets officers, loan review specialists and others involved in business and commercial lending Read More

Shopping Cart

Your cart is empty